Comments from dallasmovietheaters

Showing 1 - 25 of 4,105 comments

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Plymouth Drive-In on Jun 19, 2024 at 6:54 pm

The Plymouth Drive-In Theatre launched July 8, 1949 with Esther Williams in “This Time For Keeps.”

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Daly Theatre on Jun 19, 2024 at 6:51 pm

Mr. A. Shepherd “Shep” Brinkley opened the (Augustin) Daly Theatre on June 17, 1946 with North Carolina-born Kathryn Grayson in “Two Sisters from Boston”. The theatre was named for 19th Century playwright Augustin Daly who was a native of Plymouth, North Carolina. Seating was listed at 500 at launch. The Daly replaced the New (Old) Theatre which had burned in 1939 and was also owned by Brinkley.

The Daly Theatre operated as a weekend-only theater playing discount, sub-run double features. It closed permanently on October 8, 1955 with a Lucille Ball double feature of “Valley of the Sun” and “Too Many Girls.” It was next used as a house of worship.

dallasmovietheaters
dallasmovietheaters commented about Plymouth Theatre on Jun 19, 2024 at 6:02 pm

Mr. A. Shepherd “Shep” Brinkley opened the Plymouth Theatre October 11, 1938 with “The Vogues of 1938.“ The New Theatre changed its name whimsically to the New (Old) Theatre that day until it burned down in 1939. Brinkley would add the Daly Theatre after the War to replace the New (Old).

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Plymouth Theatre on Jun 19, 2024 at 4:19 pm

Open October 11, 1938 with “The Vogues of 1938”

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Wakelon Theater on Jun 19, 2024 at 2:22 pm

Howell Theatres launched the Wakelon on September 2, 1937 with The Marx Brothers in “A Day at the Races.”

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Hwy 17 Drive-In on Jun 18, 2024 at 12:59 pm

Minor note: its name is the Hi-Way 17 Drive-In (not Hwy 17 D-I).

And remove note: “The address above is my best guess as to her explanation of where it was.” The address now provided is its former address.

dallasmovietheaters
dallasmovietheaters commented about Midway Drive-In on Jun 17, 2024 at 5:27 pm

Opened July 22, 1948 with “Up Goes Maisie”

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Eden Theatre on Jun 17, 2024 at 5:14 pm

Launched at 102 West Eden street on May 18, 1948, its first film was “The Return of Rin Tin Tin” in Vitacolor. The architect was Frank Whitaker Benton. In 1962, the building was offered for $15,750 and, not long after, the Colonial Furniture launched an annex store in the former Eden Theatre. Offered for sale in 2024, it was listed for $320,000.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Havelock Drive-In on Jun 16, 2024 at 6:14 pm

Grand reopening as the Ding Hao Drive-In Theatre in photos. For around ten seasons, it did business as the Ding Hao Drive-In and Ding-Hao Drive-In.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Cinemark 14 Lewisville & XD on Jun 16, 2024 at 4:53 am

Renamed as the Cinemark 14 Lewisville & XD when the Music City Mall concept failed. Under new operators, the struggling shopping center was renamed The Vista.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Martin Theatre on Jun 13, 2024 at 4:28 pm

The E.M. MacDaniel Building was built to house multiple business in 1939 with a theater in the center at 941 Starling. The delayed project opened on September 11, 1941 as the Starling Theatre, a streamlined movie house playing sub-run discount films. F.W. Carper opened the Starling with “Here Comes Mr. Jordan.” It was managed by John L. Garst of Martinsville’s National and Roxy theaters also owned by Carper’s circuit. The building also had Reed’s Confectionery that served as the de facto concession stand and was the original home of Gilbert’s Beauty Salon.

The Starling booth was equipped with E7 Simplex projectors with 4-Star Simplex sound. The stage was installed by Novelty Scenic of New York and the seats were designed by Heywood-Wakefield. But Wartime worker shortages were cited as the end of the road as the Starling closed with “Lady, Let’s Dance” on December 10, 1944.

The theater came back to life after the War when Bernard Depkin opened the former Starling as the Bee Dee (Bernard Depkin’s nickname) Theatre. The Bee Dee launched on April 24, 1947 with “The Best Years Of Our Lives.” At that time, Depkin operated the Rives Theatre as as manager an co-owner.

In October of 1948, W. Pritchett took on the venue and renamed it as the Martin Theatre. Pritchett moved it to a double-feature, discount sub-run movie house. Opening titles as the Martin were on October 29, 1949 were June Allyson in “Good News” and Randolph Scott in “Trial Street.” Martinsville Theatre Management (MTM) Circuit closed the Martin some 35 years later on July 3, 1985 with “The Goonies” as the theatre needed major repairs.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Rives Theatre on Jun 13, 2024 at 1:48 pm

The Rives Theatre opened in 1935. It was closed in 1984 to duplex the house. Martin Theatre Management (MTM) relaunched in time for the venue’s 50th Anniversary now as the Rives Cinema 1 & 2. The theatre rebranded to the Rives Theatre in the 21st Century playing movies until closing in 2009. It became a live theatre thereafter.

dallasmovietheaters
dallasmovietheaters commented about National Theatre on Jun 13, 2024 at 1:05 pm

Just kidding - famous hygiene commentator and non-doctor Elliot Forbes was live on the stage of the National Theatre in Martinsville.

dallasmovietheaters
dallasmovietheaters commented about Radford Theatre on Jun 11, 2024 at 4:56 am

First day: November 28, 1935.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Castle Drive-In on Jun 10, 2024 at 7:59 pm

The Castle Drive-In opened July 11, 1952 with “Sound Off” - ad in photos.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Rives Theatre on Jun 10, 2024 at 7:21 pm

The Rives Theatre opened in 1935.

dallasmovietheaters
dallasmovietheaters commented about Friendly Drive-In on Jun 10, 2024 at 3:00 pm

The Friendly Drive-In Theatre opened on June 22, 1950 with “Red Canyon.” It went widescreen in 1957 and did not advertise after that season. The lot is auctioned in 1970 likely at the end of its 20-year lease and is sold for other purposes.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about 220 Drive-In on Jun 10, 2024 at 2:43 pm

L.L. Theimer’s South Drive-In Theaters Inc. opened its 23d location with the 220 Drive-In Theatre in 1968. It launched August 30, 1968 with Clint Eastwood in “Hang ‘em High” supported by three cartoons.

But the fame and legacy of the 220 Drive-In occurred when the drive-in hosted The Allman Brothers live during their third Rock Festival of the 1970 season on August 9, 1970. The last ad for the 220 was a November 27, 1977 double feature with Roger Corman’s “Moonshine County Express” and “Hustler Squad.” However, the ozoner likely opened for part of the 1978 season closing at the end of its 20-year lease.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about 220 Drive-In on Jun 10, 2024 at 2:34 pm

August 9, 1970.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Roxy Theatre on Jun 10, 2024 at 1:34 pm

The Roxy was getting ready to open for Frances W. Carper and, in 1930, just prior to the Roxy Theater opening, he was sued. It seems that Carper sold the silent Midway Theater in town to the Martinsville Theatre Corporation signing a non-compete clause. But then he created a sound movie theater asking his dad and wife to operate it. Martinsville Corp. said that he was still competing against their National and Midway theaters. The Roxy still opened on schedule in 1930.

The Roxy was converted to widescreen in the 1950s to present CinemaScope films. On September 9, 1963, the Roxy closed permanently with a double feature of Tony Curtis in “40 Pounds of Trouble” and Edward Judd in “Mystery Submarine.” Within 24 hours, the marquee was dismantled and soon after the building was converted by Frith Construction for other retail purposes.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Metro Drive-In on Jun 9, 2024 at 8:42 pm

This venue opened as the Metropolitan Airport Theater by Lawrence and Stella Micelli. The MAT opened on May 20, 1949 with Lucille Ball in “Personal Column” supported by “That Old Gang of Mine” with the East Side Kids. It was located less than two miles from Palmer Metropolitan Airport.

The theater’s name was changed three times. In 1951, it became the Metropolitan Airport Drive-In. “Airport” was dropped making it the Metropolitan Drive-In Theatre for the 1953 through early 1956 operational cycle. On July 25, 1956, it had a new widescreen tower to project CinemaScope titles staring with “Picnic” and was truncated to the Metro Drive-In. The Micelli family operated the Metro D-I to its 1986 closure. It final double-bill was on September 7, 1986 with “Maximum Overdrive” and “Friday the 13th, Part VI.”

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Roxy Theatre on Jun 9, 2024 at 6:59 pm

The Roxy replaced the silent Lincoln Theatre on September 6, 1930 with a grand opening film was Dolores Del Rio in “The Bad One.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Forest Theatre on Jun 7, 2024 at 9:00 am

HKS Architects is handling the 2024/5 redesign - some concept drawings are in photos.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about Moonlight Drive-In on Jun 6, 2024 at 12:54 pm

May 25, 1949 grand opening ad in photos.

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dallasmovietheaters commented about 440 Twin Drive-In on Jun 6, 2024 at 12:43 pm

May 7, 1969 grand opening with “The Wrecking Crew” and “The Big Gun Down” on the North Screen and “Swiss Family Robinson” and “Kimberly Jim” on the South Screen.